Social Mood Conference | Socionomics Foundation

Post Tagged with: "Authoritarianism"

  • [Article] Federal Employees Under Scrutiny

    [Article] Federal Employees Under Scrutiny

    Increasingly authoritarian government rule is not surprising given the ongoing bear market in social mood at Cycle, Supercycle and Grand Supercycle degree.

     
  • [Article] Electronic Freedom: Checking the Internet’s Vital Signs

    [Article] Electronic Freedom: Checking the Internet’s Vital Signs

    In a period of negative mood, many governments will pull the plug on large swaths of the Internet. In the U.S., the landscape is rapidly changing to make such action possible.

     
  • [Press] TSA: Transportation Security… Authoritarians?

    [Press] TSA: Transportation Security… Authoritarians?

    GAINESVILLE, Ga. / November 22, 2010 – The Socionomics Institute says the TSA’s new, controversial security policies are a predictable step in a trend toward much more restricted travel.

     
  • [Press] Julian Assange and the Faucet of Secrets

    [Press] Julian Assange and the Faucet of Secrets

    GAINESVILLE, Ga. / November 5, 2010 – Why is WikiLeaks airing the dirty secrets of powerful nations now? What motivates the sources of the leaks—and why are they revealing their secrets now? To paraphrase a U.S. President, “It’s the bear market, stupid.”

     
  • [Article] Declining Social Mood Means Increasing Surveillance in the U.S.

    [Article] Declining Social Mood Means Increasing Surveillance in the U.S.

    Increased expressions of authoritarianism in concert with declining social mood.

     
  • [Article] Mass Arrests in Turkey’s Ergenekon Case

    [Article] Mass Arrests in Turkey’s Ergenekon Case

    In 2001, reports say, evidence emerged of an upcoming Turkish coup d’état attempt. The newly elected government took little action regarding the plot for over half a decade. Then in 2007 it suddenly launched a massive investigation and began making arrests. Many in Turkey and elsewhere believe the plot to be an invention or an exaggeration by the Turkish government and an excuse to jail dissidents.

     
  • [Article] WikiLeaks Takes Center Stage; Government Reactions Intensify

    [Article] WikiLeaks Takes Center Stage; Government Reactions Intensify

    Originally published in the Aug. 2010 Socionomist   In his two-part April and May study published in The Socionomist, Alan Hall predicted that: A continuing long-term trend toward negative social mood will cause society to become increasing fearful. This movement will lead to polarized views toward authoritarianism. Increases in surveillance […]

     
  • [Article] Authoritarianism Study: Part 2

    [Article] Authoritarianism Study: Part 2

    By Alan Hall, originally published in the May 2010 Socionomist The Source of Authoritarian Expression, And The Road Ahead Sociologists typically study authoritarianism within a left-right political spectrum. But as we showed in Part I, a society’s authoritarian impulse is rooted in social mood. Our socionomic Nolan chart illustrates how […]

     
  • [Article] Authoritarianism Versus Anti-authoritarianism: The Tension Boils Over As  Negative Mood Deepens

    [Article] Authoritarianism Versus Anti-authoritarianism: The Tension Boils Over As Negative Mood Deepens

    Socionomics posits that waves of social mood motivate the rise of authoritarian governments, and that the current wave could put a new group of dictators into office. Part 1 of this study shows that over the past 300 years, the world’s most notorious authoritarians rose to power or committed their worst atrocities during or soon after bear markets. He also clarifies shifts in what’s considered socially, politically and morally normal and why it’s important to know about these changing trends today. Part 2 explains the grassroots sources of authoritarian desire and forecasts ways in which it will most likely manifest itself in the future.

     
  • [Article] During Negative Mood Periods, Society Redefines What’s “Normal”

    [Article] During Negative Mood Periods, Society Redefines What’s “Normal”

    We forecast that a continuing long-term trend toward negative social mood will produce increasingly authoritarian—and anti-authoritarian—impulses and eventually lead to the appearance of severe authoritarian regimes around the globe.